An insight into the publishing world…

Posts tagged ‘kevin duffy’

Introducing Kevin Duffy, Founder of Bluemoose Books

I am incredibly honoured to feature Kevin Duffy of Bluemoose Books, an independent publishing house, on my blog today. I first met Kevin at a Society of Young Publishers event a few years ago now, and since then I have been a big follower of the company. Bluemoose Books have enjoyed enormous success in their short time of publishing. Their book Gabriel’s Angel is a particular favourite of mine. Read on to find out more.

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Kevin and Hetha Duffy with author Ben Myers, winning The inaugural Gordon Burn Prize with PIG IRON.

Please can you introduce yourself and give a brief overview of your own career.

My name is Kevin Duffy and I started Bluemoose Books with my wife Hetha after re-mortgaging our house. I have been involved in sales and marketing in publishing over the last 30 years with commercial, academic, fiction and non – fiction publishing companies

How did Bluemoose come about and how many staff do you have?

We started Bluemoose as a result of me winning a national writing competition, being whisked down to London, wined and dined at The Ivy by the directors of Macmillan and an uber agent from Curtis Brown. However, they didn’t want my book. I then read in The Bookseller that all the big money was being given to Irish writers, so I changed my name to Colm O’Driscoll, sent off the first three chapters to Darley Andersons, agents to Martina Cole and Lee Child. I had to be Irish for a year, even lied to my children telling them that if a posh man from London rings and asks for Colm that is me, your dad. Confusion reigned but after sending the finished book I got a contract. He sent it out to all the big publishers and all the editors loved the book but the most important people in publishing, and that remains the same today, the commercial directors didn’t think they could sell 20,000 copies, so they didn’t publish. After twelve months I got the book back. We re-mortgaged our house in Hebden Bridge, started Bluemoose and the first two books we published were my book Anthills and Stars by me The Bridge Between by Canadian author Nathan Vanek. We made enough money from these two books to continue and we’ve published 25 books since.

I am full time and we have four freelance editors.

What kind of literature do you publish?

We publish cracking stories which are beautifully written that engage and inspire readers.

Many of your books have now received awards/sold film rights/been translated into numerous languages. What would you say has been your biggest success so far?

I think all our books are successes. The beauty of Independence is that we don’t have the acute economic imperative that the big corporates have. In their world if a book doesn’t succeed economically straight away, the author is dropped. We’re here for the long haul. Books we published five years ago like GABRIEL’S ANGEL by Mark A Radcliffe, still sell really well. NOD by Adrian Barnes has sold incredibly well, and has just been published in North America. PIG IRON and BEASTINGS by Benjamin Myers have won awards and been short listed for others too. KING CROW by Michael Stewart still sells and we published that in 2011. Our biggest seller was the non-fiction book THE HARDEST CLIMB by Alistair Sutcliffe. The story of how he overcame a life threatening brain haemorrhage after being the first man to climb the highest mountain on each of the seven continents at the first attempt. He was on BBC Radio 4’s midweek programme and the sales went doolally tap.
What book are you particularly looking forward to publishing?

Our list for 2016 is stunning.

IF YOU LOOK FOR ME, I AM NOT HERE by Indian writer Sarayu Srivastra in January. The second novel by Anna Chilvers, TAINTED LOVE in March. The debut, THE LESS THAN PERFECT LEGEND OF DONNA CREOSOTE by Dan Micklethwaite in July. The CODEX EPIPHANIX by David E Oprava in September and the debut, THE HANDSWORTH TIMES by Sharon Duggel in September too.

What were some of the risks you had to take into consideration when starting your own independent publishing company?

Losing our house was the biggest issue. Getting it hopelessly wrong and not being taken seriously. Marketing, sales and building a relationship with booksellers on the high street and with libraries too.

What does Bluemoose Books have to offer that others don’t or what do you feel makes your company unique?

We are the delicatessens of the publishing world. Our books are honed and polished and made the best they can be. We spend an inordinate amount of time in editing and working with our authors. After all, they are the most important people in publishing, because they create the wonderful stories we want to read. As a family of readers and writers with differing reading tastes we know that once we’ve agreed to publish an author, our passion and individually tailored marketing and sales will get our books into reader’s hands.

Why do you feel that independents are good for the publishing industry?

I think Independents are actually in a different publishing industry than the corporates. We are the only ones taking risks with new writers and promoting new voices. We are to some extent the R&D departments of the corporate world. It is interesting to know that 4 of the last 8 winners of The Man Booker have come from the Independent sector. Our publishing decisions are made on the quality of the stories. The economic imperative is first and foremost the main consideration for the corporate publishing world. Great stories are not made round the committee table, great stories are created in the minds of authors. We give our writers time and space to create these stories. If literature is about anything it is about new writers and new voices. As the books editor of The Guardian recently said, ‘It is the independents that are driving innovation in publishing.’

You’re a big voice for publishing in the North and often discuss class and region in terms of publishing. Why is it so important that we continue to promote publishing up North?

Geography shouldn’t dictate what is published. I get that historically the publishing industry has been in London but with internships alienating so many creative people entering publishing in London, we are limiting the creative and talented pool of people which will make publishing more dynamic. Having a Northern Power house of publishing in the north will enable wonderfully creative and talented people to get jobs in publishing without having to go down to London. Publishing needs diversity, people who have different life experiences and backgrounds not just the homogenised group of people who come from the same educational institutions and dominate what is being published today. We are justly proud to be a publisher based in the North but we are just as proud to have published stories that are sold in over 42 countries around the world.

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You can follow Bluemoose Books on Twitter @ofmooseandmen

Find out more about the company here. http://www.bluemoosebooks.com/

Gabriel’s Angel by Mark A. Radcliffe

gabriels angel

Gabriel Bell is a grumpy 44-year old web journalist irritated by the accumulating disappointments of life. He and his girlfriend Ellie want to start a family, but Gabriels has so few sperm he can name them and knit them flippers. So it’s IVF, which is expensive. Losing his job was bad enough, but getting run over and waking up to find himself in a therapy group run by angels really annoys him.
In Gabriels’ group are a professional killer and his last victim, as well as the woman whose car put Gabriel and herself in a coma. From this therapeutic community, just beneath Heaven, they can see the lives of those they have left behind and how they cope. Will the one hit wonder resurrect his Eighties band for a reunion tour? And can Ellie and her friends retrieve what they need from Gabriel’s comatose body, so that she at least can finish what they started?

If the group do well in therapy they may be a allowed to pass into Heaven, or go back to finish their lives. If not, it’s Hell. Or worse, more therapy.

Have you ever wanted to find a book that is equally hilarious as it is heartbreaking, thought-provoking and moving, gentle and yet action-packed? You need to read Gabriel’s angel. It is a truly unique book.

Part of the beauty of it is just how easy it is to read – I got through this book so quickly and smoothly, like a hot knife through butter. But while it’s easy to read, it’s certainly not because the writing is simple or not trying hard enough, it’s just because the writing style is so crystal clear and yet so inviting at the same time. It has a very original concept at the heart of it, which makes it appealing to me in a literary world swamped with millions of stories that are so similar to each other. The idea of there being a celestial group counselling facility somewhere in the astral plane between life and death is both hilarious and fascinating. How do you go about tackling such a concept?

Mark A. Radcliffe takes this idea and runs off with it, producing a novel full of humour and philosophical messages. At the heart there are a number of very different character types – Gabriel, the main protagonist, who is innately good but is struggling with the stress of being made redundant and going through IVF. Yvonne, a successful but bitter woman who was murdered by the evil Kevin who has no moral compass whatsoever. There is Julie, the woman who accidentally crashed into Gabriel and caused them both to go into comas, who had the misfortune of having to take part in a counselling section in limbo just as she was starting to find real happiness. There is Christopher, an angel who suffers constant internal turmoil as he second-guesses the morality of all of his own actions and decisions. Clemetius, the main ‘counsellor’ angel, shows himself to be a dodgy character more and more throughout the story – showing that even those who are meant to be ‘perfect’ in Heaven can’t pull this off.

There is also a parallel narrative that is going on on Earth involving Gabriel’s bereaved wife and her best friend, and Julie’s ex-boyfriend and his disappointing life and unrealised dreams. Hilarious antics occur both after death and back on earth, with hare-brained schemes to retrieve sperm from a comatose IVF patient to desperate attempts to reform an old 80’s band with has-been old men. With such a wide spectrum of colourful characters and events, this book was endlessly entertaining.

It explores questions such as: Who deserves a second chance or redemption? Has the way you have lived your life been worthy or wasteful? What is right or wrong, and can anyone be 100% good or bad? Does the world owe us anything? Can anything be intrinsic when all we do nowadays is question how everything works? Gabriel’s Angel  completely modernises and rewrites the idea of God and how he works, reflecting the ever-changing nature of today’s society.

‘Think of it like this. A modern God, a God in touch with the nuances and struggles of modern life, would know that the things people do are not necessarily indicative of who they are. That sometimes, quite often in fact, we need to look beyond the actions of a person and see inside them to truly understand what motivates them and who, in fact, they are. Moreover, a modern God would recognise that it is by addressing the inner turmoil that can haunt you all, that one might truly address sin.’

…Finally Yvonne spoke. ‘Oh my,’ she said softly. ‘Someone has killed God and replaced him with a social worker.’

Gabriel’s Angel is published by the amazingly successful independent publisher Bluemoose Books and I enjoyed it so much. There is no question about it: if you don’t give this book a chance, you’re making a mistake.

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