An insight into the publishing world…

Sooo, it’s about time I started reviewing the books in my 52 Books by 52 Publishers reading challenge!

First up is:

snow-books

 

Snow Books!

 

 

About Snow Books:

“IT’S MORE THAN TEN YEARS SINCE OUR FIRST BOOKS WERE PUBLISHED IN 2004.

Snowbooks started in a spare room in Hackney in April 2003 and soon moved to a couple of rented desks in a business incubator on Old Street — before it was cool. We hired staff, signed up authors and our first books hit the shelves in 2004. Waterstone’s — with a possessive apostrophe back then — were our first and most supportive customer and with their backing our first books sold several tens of thousands of copies.

We’ve always been very interested in the business side of publishing — about being more efficient and canny than others. Early on, it pretty soon gave us a high profile. We won a Nibbie, then another one, then an IPA award too. Later, our books started to win prizes too: The Red Men got shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke award and Mark Hodder won the Philip K Dick award with Spring Heeled Jack. You can find reviews of our books everywhere, from The Telegraph and The Sun to SFX Magazine and The Guardian and on all shapes and sizes of blog.

Our efficiency has been made possible by our technological skill. We are publishers-turned-Ruby on Rails developers, specializing in web application development and database management. With the benefit of a sizeable Arts Council grant we launched a sister company, General Products Ltd, in 2012. Through it we licence the software we’ve written to other publishers, in the expectation that it’ll help them as much as it helps Snowbooks. Our main product is Bibliocloud.com, an enterprise-level publishing management system. The website you’re reading right now was populated with data and images from Bibliocloud’s API in a single click. The combination of sleek technological efficiency and solid creative excellence is, for us, as potent and heady a combination as it’s ever been. And in 2013, Bibliocloud won us the Futurebook Best Technology Innovation award.

So here’s to the next ten years. Let’s hope it’s as fun as the first.”

Find out more about Snow Books and check out the rest of their titles here.

 

The book I’m reviewing from Snow Books is….

 

ydbh

You Don’t Belong Here by Tim Major.

 

Daniel Faint is on the run with a stolen time machine. As the house-sitter of a remote Cumbrian mansion, he hopes to hide and experiment with the machine. But is the Manor being watched by locals, his twin brother or even himself? Daniel is terrified about what the future may hold but, as he discovers, there can be no going back.

I loved this book! It really is unusual in a fascinating way. Despite the fact that the book is about time travel, it really didn’t feel too science-fiction-y to me, which I was quite happy with. It made the subject matter feel accessible. Daniel isn’t a scientist. He isn’t a great mind. He’s just a troubled man with a guilt-ridden past, looking for something to give his life a bit of meaning and excitement again.

After a little bit of a slow start, the book quickly picked up its pace. Daniel finds himself with a stolen time machine that he’s taken from a research facility, deep in the rural countryside of Cumbria. There the paranoia kicks in almost immediately. Who is watching him? Who can he trust? How can he hide this rather huge secret? How can he master the capabilities of the machine?

I particularly enjoyed the easy-to-read narrative which is studded with poetic writing and scenes of time-travel (and the subsequent confusion it creates). The time travel element unsurprisingly adds to the deep sense of mystery and allows the reader to really experience the feeling of detachment that Daniel suffers. Is he doing the right thing? How can he make the time machine take him to a time and place of his choosing?

Daniel’s obsession with his twin brother William is particularly fascinating throughout the book. You get the sense, after a little while, that Daniel feels uneasy or guilty about something to do with his brother. This guilt is there under the surface of the narrative throughout the story, humming away as  background noise until it emerges at some point in the book and hits you like a punch in the stomach.

There are some really strong characters in the book, giving the story a real richness and realistic feel. The women are strong and defiant, at the same time as showing real vulnerability when things get hard or terrifying. The male characters provide a real rainbow of seriously interesting personalities, including a rogue hunter, a shady figure from Daniel’s past, an untrusting gardener and a loving, dedicated brother.

There is also an unrelated twist at the end which was brilliant, and something I really didn’t see coming. Of course I won’t give away any spoilers, but it’s really worth reading for this aspect of the story alone.

All in all, this book deserves a massive FOUR stars. Really well done to the author, Tim Major, and to the independent publishing house Snow Books.

four-stars

 

 

 

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