An insight into the publishing world…

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I love how unique this book is; how completely honest and open Janet is about her past and her feelings. I think everyone who feels nostalgia for days gone by would very much enjoy this novel.

June 1981: That night. The night we made love in desperation. So much emotion, so much need. But now I’m sure of one thing. It’s rapid cell division rather than stress that has been messing with my biology.

Dallas is on the telly, Abba are number one, Starsky and Hutch are on her bedroom wall – and Janet is falling in love for the first time. In the warm glow of the local pub, with cider, Tetley’s and a close-knit gang of friends, life for Janet and Mark couldn’t be better. Then, one morning, her mother’s worst fears for Janet are realised and a decision is made that will change everything.

Nothing Ever Happens in Wentbridge is a true story from the emotional front line of a first love. This beautiful and vivid account of Mark and Janet, their lives, love and loss, shows how the mind has an uncanny ability to ignore what it doesn’t want to acknowledge. Until it has to.

We’ve all been there: finding ourselves at a critical point in our lives which makes us look back on our childhood, school and college life and wonder what would have been different if only a different decision had been made. We’ve all definitely had a first love before too.

In this true story, we travel back in time with Janet to look at how the past shaped her future and how her psyche managed to hide itself from her for all of these years. All of the stress and negative things that happen to her are tamped down and stifled, and Janet soldiers on through upset, heartbreak and trauma, completely unaware of the real impact it has on her. As we go through the chain of events that made up her childhood and adolescent years, it is fascinating to see how things that were seemingly small at the time actually had a huge impact on the adult. It opens up the reader’s eyes to the damage that can be caused if you don’t face and deal with those real problems in life – both psychological and physical.

The book is written from the point of view of Janet – teenaged Janet gives us her voice through a series of diary entries throughout the book. Adult Janet interjects these passages with a narrative of her own and it gives a real intriguing angle to the story. We can see throughout the book how each of these events that happen to young Janet – and all of the decisions she makes – affect Janet’s adult life and outlook on the world around her.

The novel takes us through the years of Janet’s relationship with her first true love, Mark; it highlights the often oppressive nature of her parents, and her struggle in finding the right career and finding somewhere that truly feels like home. The book is genuinely funny but unbelievably touching. It is relatable and very approachable. It explores the beauty and incredible complexity of human love, in all its forms and incarnations. It shows that love and life isn’t just black and white. It does all of this while taking us on one woman’s fascinating journey through early life.

Janet is originally from my home town of Hull and moved around England throughout her life. There are a few parallels in her life to mine: I’ve lived in some of the places that she’s lived in and had to make similar decisions regarding my career. It shows that a lot of people’s struggles and triumphs are universal and this book will speak to so many of you.

Ultimately what it showed me is that nothing is perfect, nothing is easy, but things can be fun along the way and when they aren’t, you can learn from it. This book was both fun and heartbreaking and really, really worth a read. It made me want to read more true life stories.

A big thank you to Janet Watson and Route Publishing for supplying the book. Much appreciated!

 

 

 

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