An insight into the publishing world…

The Crooked Beat

When Joe Geraghty’s brother finds himself in financial trouble, it’s only natural that he turns to the Private Investigator for help. But when it relates to a missing consignment of smuggled cigarettes, it’s not so easily sorted. Drawn into the murky world of local and international criminals around the busy port of Hull, Geraghty knows the only way to save his brother is to take on the debt himself. As he attempts to find a way out of the situation, the secrets and conspiracies he uncovers are so deeply buried in the past, he knows he’s facing people willing to do whatever it takes to keep them that way.

Writing this book review will be a little bit harder than others as I sailed through it so quickly I forgot to stop to make notes or highlights! So this review will be from memory.

First off, I should say I was thrilled to have the opportunity to read a book set in my home town of Hull (if you hadn’t guessed from many of my other posts that that’s where I’m from!) It’s also a little bit surreal. I’m used to having to picture and build locations in my own head from my imagination, but in this case I just had to picture places that I have known my entire life. Perhaps that’s part of what made it such an easy read (other than its readability, of course!)

What is interesting is that, conversely, it also showed me a side of Hull that I could never have imagined by myself: a world of private investigators and violent gangsters. It shone a light on how easy it can be for people to be unaware of the dangers that could be surrounding them.

The beauty of this book is that even though there is plenty of gangster-style action, which allows the book to keep a good pace and keep the reader gripped, interwined with this is real emotion, real love and loyalty especially between family members, and real depth. It is not violence or grittiness for the sake of it. Nick Quantrill makes the story real and convincing by making us really feel for his characters – and that includes both hating them or loving them. And another intriguing thing about the whole story is that no character is straight-up morally black or white. Good people make mistakes, bad people redeem themselves and some characters hide their true colours under masks that fool other people. I won’t give away which characters are which, as part of the magic of the book is discovering this as you read through.

I saw a hell of a lot of myself in Joe Geraghty, which is why I think I’ve grown to love him as a character. He has so much love and loyalty for his family, that he would literally sacrifice anything for them. Nothing is too much if it means he can protect them. He also has a very sharp mind, which makes the mystery and detective work all the more gripping. He isn’t infallible, however, and that is made clear too, which only makes him more human.

I really, really enjoyed this book. Nick Quantrill is big on the literature scene for a reason. His work is getting noticed. His books are brilliant to read. You would not regret giving this one a read, especially if you’re a crime fiction fan. I fully recommend it!

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